You are the light of the world. A town built on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven. Matthew 5:14-16

Friday, August 30, 2013

Feisty Women of the American Revolution
Sarah Franklin Bache

A to Z blog hop at Patterings.
         
This post is part of an A to Z blog hop. This week's letter is "F"
Sarah Franklin "Sally" Bache
         Many women made contributions to the Revolutionary War effort. American men, to their credit, recognized their value and the fact that American women tended to be feisty.
        Once, Lord Cornwallis said that the British weren’t fighting only farmers with pitchforks and sickles, but their wives as well. Samuel Adams reportedly said, “With ladies on our side, we can make every Tory tremble.”
        Sarah Franklin “Sally” Bache, born September 11, 1744, to Benjamin Franklin and Deborah Read, was one of those feisty women.
        An ardent patriot during the Revolutionary War, she raised $300,000 for the Continental Army, the equivalent of $3 million today.
       Sarah also did extensive relief work. For example, as part of her involvement with the Ladies Association of Philadelphia, under her leadership the group made 2,200 shirts for soldiers at the Continental army’s winter quarters at Valley Forge in 1777.        
      Sarah loved music and was a skilled harpsichordist. She also loved reading. Those accomplishments, coupled with the fact that she grew up in an educated, opinionated household, equipped her to serve as the hostess for her father’s gatherings upon his return in 1775 from France.

I'm linking to Ms. Barbie's blog today as she talks about a fantastic event her community organzied "For the least of these."

 

10 comments:

  1. I love stories of women behind the frontline doing their part while the men are out fighting. I recently discovered an ancestor who beat a redcoat over the head with a frying pan because he came to take her patriot husband away. What a woman!

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    1. I've made it my goal to focus on the contributions of women to the American Revolution. That includes a list of South Carolina backcountry women whom I call "Cast-iron Chamomiles." These women could not only “bring home the bacon and fry it up in a pan,” but could shoot the pig, haul it to the barn, and butcher it, making use of every single part, including the hair on its jowls.

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  2. Oooh, I adore that word...feisty. :D
    And those were some smart men.
    Wishing you a Son-kissed weekend, my friend. :)

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  3. Hi, Dora. Feisty is a good word. And yay for the weekend.

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  4. Love this stuff :) Thanks for linking up!!

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    1. Joanne! Thanks so much for stopping by. I enjoyed reading about your community event.

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  5. That was an interesting account of feisty females. My grandmother was one,too, but sorry to say,neither my mother nor I inherited that trait.

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    1. Barbara! It was YOUR community event. Special thing you and your community did.

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  6. Women of the American Revolution is one of my passions as I'm a DAR! Great post!

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